Agnieszka Borowiak

Agnieszka Borowiak

Agnieszka Borowiak

Agnieszka Borowiak (MA) – an English teacher. She has experience in teaching groups of EFL learners of different age and levels also at the management and logistics programs. Her scholarly interests lie in Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL), learner autonomy, motivation and error correction. She is an author of scientific papers focusing on CLIL….

Agnieszka Borowiak (MA) – an English teacher. She has experience in teaching groups of EFL learners of different age and levels also at the management and logistics programs. Her scholarly interests lie in Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL), learner autonomy, motivation and error correction. She is an author of scientific papers focusing on CLIL. She has delivered several presentations regarding the aforementioned topics during scientific conferences. She inspires teachers and headmasters of primary and secondary schools to practice CLIL. She has a diploma in Educational Management and Administration and also to practice as a coach and mentor, which involves useful tools to encourage individuals to monitor their own learning processes and a future career path.

“To speak or not to speak – to CLIL or not to CLIL?”

In the globalized world, people are expected to know at least one foreign language to communicate easily. They should poses certain learning strategies, digital competences and career abilities. Hence EFL classrooms in particular should provide learners with practices and processes focused on acquiring and developing skills such as creativity, critical thinking, collaboration, self-direction, and cross-cultural skills. Scholars interested in foreign language teaching take the view that the traditional foreign language classes are not efficacious enough for the new generations of students who need different stimuli to get all competences required for their future profession. Especially developing speaking in a foreign language seems to be a difficult venture for teachers. The way out of the conundrum may be Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL).

CLIL courses increase opportunities for authentic communication and interaction while attention is focused on content. This type of practice contributes to oral fluency. This is one of the major linguistic benefits of CLIL teaching. Thus, the aim of this paper is to present theoretical underpinnings of Content and Language Integrated Learning being a perfect way of developing speaking skills. Prior to this discussion, CLIL definitions, CLIL variants applied abroad and in Poland will be presented. The final part delineates some practical examples of speaking activities which may be used in a CLIL classroom.